Carbon Monoxide safety tips for Gas Safety Week 2017

Carbon Monoxide safety tips for Gas Safety Week 2017

We’re offering Carbon Monoxide safety tips in aid of Gas Safety Week 2017, running from 18th to 24th September. This cause sees organisations, like ourselves, working together to raise awareness of the dangers that can come from poorly maintaining gas appliances. There are two main tips we’d like to offer for effective Carbon Monoxide safety: understanding the causes and preventions, and installing Carbon Monoxide detectors.

Understand the causes and preventions

Prevention is only possible by understanding the potential sources of a Carbon Monoxide leak and putting in the right safety precautions. Leaving gas appliances unserviced, burning charcoal, and blocking chimneys are just a few potential causes of Carbon Monoxide leaks, and subsequently, poisoning. Make sure a Gas Safe registered engineer installs, fixes, and regularly services your gas appliances for maximum safety.

It’s not only important you know how Carbon Monoxide poisoning can occur, you need to know if you – or somebody you know – has been poisoned by the gas. The six main signs of CO poisoning are as follows:

  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Breathlessness
  • Nausea
  • Collapsing
  • Loss of consciousness

Installing Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Whether you’re able to prevent a Carbon Monoxide leak in your home or not, you should have Carbon Monoxide detectors in place. Since the poisonous gas is so lethal and otherwise undetectable, these inexpensive detectors are literally lifesavers.

It’s not enough to just place a detector in a random position in your home – install them thoughtfully near gas appliances that could leak Carbon Monoxide. Be sure to install at least one detector on each floor of your home, and remember, regularly testing detectors significantly increases the chances of detection should a leak occur.

Read our guide for more on Carbon Monoxide detection.

Pledge your support for Gas Safety Week 2017 to help reduce the risk of Carbon Monoxide poisoning, as well as other gas-related hazards such as leaks, fires, and explosions. Visit our Advice Centre for more helpful tips and information!

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